Research Grants

2020-2021

Group Research Project

From Dallas to Berlin: The Transnationalization of Meaning?
Project Head: Prof. Gisela Dachs, DAAD Center for German Studies
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Ethnic Diversity in Public Institutions as a Vehicle for Immigrants’ Trust in German Local Authorities
Project Head: Prof. Pazit Ben-Nun Bloom, Political Sciences
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Migration, Migration and Medicine at State Margins: A German-Israeli Comparative Study
Project Head: Prof. Nurit Stadler, Sociology and Anthropology
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 

Individual Research Projects

Dr. Noga Stiassny, post-doctoral fellow, Contemporary Germany Studies
Representations of German Landscapes within Contemporary Israeli Art
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Michael Ziv Kenet, PhD candidate, Political Science
The Case for Democra-city: Napoli Citta Autonoma
Funded by the Corinaldi Fund
 
Dr. Igor Rodin, post-doctoral fellow, Communication & Journalism
Metaphysics of Russian Action Art
Funded by the Marjorie Mayrock Center for Russian, Euro-Asian and East-European Research
 
Noga Sagi, PhD candidate, Contemporary Germany Studies
Collective Memory, Cultural Diplomay and Jewish Identity: The Role of Vienna'a Jewish Community in Austrian-Israeli Relations
Funded by the Aron Menczer Fund
 

2019-2020

Group Research Projects

Commemorating the Holocaust in the Digital Age – Immersion, Augmentation, Virtual Reality
Project Head: Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann, DAAD Center for German Studies
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Migration, Minorities and Medicine at State Margins: A Germany-Israel Comparative Study
Project Head: Prof. Nurit Stadler, Sociology and Anthropology
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 

Individual Research Projects

Irit Chen, PhD candidate, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
The Purchasing Misstion to Cologne between Israel and Germany, 1953-1965
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Mor Geller, MA student, History
Surveyed Screens: State, Society, and Cinematic Consumption in Late East Germany
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Aleksandra Gokhshteyn, MA student, Contemporary Germany Studies
EU Law Primacy in Germany, France and Italy: Human Rights Comparative Perspective
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
Watch presentation
 
Yiftach Shavit, MA student, History
Vernacular Photography and Postwar German Jewish Remigration
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
Watch presentation
 
Aviya Doron, PhD candidate, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
Trust thy Neighbor? Risk and Trust in Economic Interactions between Jews and Christians in the German Empire c. 1280-1420
Funded by the Aron Menczer Fund
 
Asaf Koliner, PhD candidate, History
Aesthetics & History: The turn of Italian Popular Cinema to History as its Subject Matter: 1960-1975
Funded by the Corinaldi Fund
 
Esfir Mailman, MA student, Romance Studies
The Creation of the Woman and the Aesthetic Project of Eliminating the Self: The Dissolving Boundaries, the Abject and the Dolls in the Neapolitan Quartet by Elena Ferrante
Funded by the Corinaldi Fund
Watch presentation
 
Livia Tagliacozzo, PhD candidate, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
In the Shadow of War: Antisemitic Policy and the Italian-Jewish Relations in the Colony of Libya (1940-1943)
Funded by the Corinaldi Fund
Watch presentation
 
Anna Balestrieri, PhD candidate, Russian Studies
Russian-Jewish Press in the Emigration: The Case of “Rassvet” (1922-1934 Berlin-Paris): Internal History and External Context
Funded by the Marjorie Mayrock Center for Russian, Euro-Asian and East-European Research
Watch presentation
 
Nureet Dermer, PhD candidate (stage A), Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
“Between Expulsions”: Daily Encounters between Jews and Christians in Northern France,1285-1394
Funded by the Paul Desmarais Center for the Study of French Culture
 

2018-2019

Group Research Project

Intersectionality and Jewish Homosexual Modernity
Project Head: Prof. Moshe Sluhovsky, the History Department and The Lafer Center for Women's and Gender Studies
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 

Individual Research Projects

Damian Filut, PhD candidate, European Studies
A Normative Transformation in the Global Development Policy and its Effect on the Donor Countries’ Landscape
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Hila Levi, MA student, Department of International Relations
Deterioration in Human Rights Protection during the Eurozone Crisis and Germany’s Involvement in the Crisis Management
Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies
 
Neri Ariel, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Talmud and Halakha
Religious identity, erudition and text production in the Medieval Jewish Community of Vienna (ca 1300-1421)
Funded by the Aron Menczer Fund
 
Dr. Sofia Mazar, post-doctoral fellow, European Studies
The Development of Italian Literature and its Influence on the Development of the Libretto and the Operatic Genre of Opera-seria in Nineteenth-Century Italy
Funded by the Corinaldi Fund
 
Rocco Giansante, PhD candidate, Department of Communications and Journalism
Armenia on Screen: The Cinematic Image of a New Old Country
Funded by the Marjorie Mayrock Center for Russian, Euro-Asian and East-European Studies
 
Dr. Irit Kornblit, post-doctoral fellow, European Studies
The Rhetoric of Naming Globalization and the Construction of France’s Collective Ethos in Intellectual and Political Discourse
Funded by the Paul Desmarais Center for the Study of French Culture
 

2017-2018

Group Research Project

Media and Migration: Visual Tropes and Media Frames of Immigration, Exile and Displacement

Project head: Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht‐Hartmann

Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies

 

Terrorism in Post-war Europe

Project heads: Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht‐Hartmann, with Prof. Arnd Bauerkämper, Department of History and Cultural Science, Free University of Berlin

Funded in the framework of the joint funding scheme of the Hebrew University and the Freie Universität Berlin 2017.

Individual Research Projects

Nitzan Chelouche, MA student, Program in Contemporary Germany: Politics, Society and Culture

The Documenta in Kassel: Visual Framing of Postwar Narratives

Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies

 
Sara Yanovsky, post-doctoral fellow, Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
Schullehrer’s Paradoxa: The Life and Work of Simon Szánto – a Hungarian Publicist and Educator in Vienna
Funded by the Aron Menczer Fund
 
Dr. Michael K. Silber, Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry

The Convocation of the First Jewish Soldiers of Joseph II 1788-1790

Funded by the City of Vienna
 
Ahuva Liberals Noiman, PhD candidate, Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry
Between Converts, Jews and Christians: Analysis of Communal and Individual Jewish Identity through the Lens of Jewish Converts to Christianity in Austria (Vienna and Surrounding Area) 1278-~1500
Funded by the City of Vienna
 

2016-2017

Group Research Project

German Postwar Visual History in an European Framework – Historiography, Appropriation, Legal Regulation

Project head: Dr. Tobias Ebbrecht‐Hartmann

Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies

 

Individual Research Projects

Shani Bar-Tuvia, PhD candidate, International Relations

The Diffusion of Restrictive Refugee Policies among Western States and the Role of Germany as a "Normative Core"

Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies

 

Marc Brüggemann, PhD candidate, German Studies

The Olympic-attack: A transnational comparison of the collective memories of Israel and Germany

Funded by the DAAD Center for German Studies

 

Daniel Aschheim, PhD candidate, European Studies

Bruno Kreisky’s Premature Role as a Peacemaker in the Middle East: The Paradoxes of Jewishness, Socialism and the Middle Eastern Conflict

Funded by the Aron Menczer Fund

 

Adi Burtman, PhD candidate, Musicology

Otellos' Jealousies: The Socio-Musical Mapping of Emotion in 19th Century Italy; Rossini's Otello ver. Verdi's

Funded by the the Center for the Study of Italian Culture and Corinaldi Fund

 

Migration, Religion and Medicine at State Margins - A German-Israeli Research Network

Shalev xxx Mirjam Lücking

What kinds of rhetoric characterize German and Israeli public (health) discourses regarding religious minorities and migrants? How do these state-minority tensions result in targeted public (health) practices, policies and legislation? And, how do they shape the experiences and practices of individuals and collectives themselves?

This interdisciplinary research network was established in 2020 to address these pressing issues. Funded by the DAAD Centre for German Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, we cross disciplinary boundaries between social sciences, humanities and law as well as international domains to examine the nexus of medicine, religion and migration today. Our collaborators are based at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Technion: Israel Institute of Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Freie Universität Berlin, University of Bayreuth, and the Max Planck Institute.

Migration is represented as a major political challenge in both Germany and Israel, with ethnic and religious minorities often framed as a threat to national character amidst demographic anxieties. While there is considerable research on health and migration in Germany and Israel, our contribution will be to explore these issues through the understudied lens of religion. Migrants and minorities – and their religious subjectivities – have been presented by media and politicians as a risk to the body politic, especially for medical issues such as higher fertility rates, circumcision, therapeutic (non-)compliance, and lower levels of vaccination coverage leading to epidemic outbreaks – which is reflected in targeted public health discourse and interventions.

Our international network enables us to explore the continuities and discontinuities, consensuses and controversies, through which religion influences migrant and minority health in Germany and Israel. Our comparative approach will advance both academic and public discussions around religious migrants and minorities amidst politically-challenging times.

CC BY-NC-ND 2 xxx Hansjörg Dilgerxxx xxx Matthias Berg Berlin - CC BY-NC-ND 2

 

People

Network Convenors

Dr Ben Kasstan
Lady Davis Research Fellow
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dr Lea Taragin-Zeller
Research Fellow
Woolf Institute and ReproSoc (Reproductive Sociology Research Group), University of Cambridge

Professor Dr Hansjörg Dilger
Head of the Medical Anthropology Research Area
Institute of Social Anthropology, Frei Univesität Berlin

Professor Dr Nurit Stadler
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Network Collaborators

Professor Dr Netta Barak-Corren
Assistant Professor
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Professor Dr Yael Hashiloni-Dolev
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Bat Sheva Hass
PhD candidate
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Professor Dr Claudia Liebelt
Assistant Professor
Social Anthropology, University of Bayreuth

Dr Mirjam Lücking
Postdoctoral Fellow
Martin Buber Society of Fellows, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dr Dominik Mattes
Postdoctoral Fellow
Collaborative Research Center 'Affective Societies' and the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin

Ursula Probst
PhD Candidate
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin

Dr Vanessa Rau
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religion & Ethnic Diversity

Dr Nasima Selim
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin

Dr Guy Shalev
Postdoctoral Fellow
Martin Buber Society of Fellows, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dr Anita von Poser
Postdoctoral Researcher
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin

Edda Willamowski
Research Associate
Affective Societies, Freie Universität Berlin

Professor Dr Tanya Zion-Waldoks
Lecturer
Seymour Fox School of Education, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Ben Kasstan

1 BK

Lady Davis Research Fellow
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Further information: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/435569

Ben Kasstan is a medical anthropologist by training, and his research interests sit at the intersection of state, health and religion. For the past seven years Ben has been exploring how areas of sexuality and reproduction emerge as public (health) anxieties and as sites of intervention, especially concerning ethnic and religious minorities. The particular areas of controversy that Ben focuses on are abortion, vaccinations and equality/inclusion. Together with Lea Taragin-Zeller, Ben will be investigating the representation of ‘non-compliant’ communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a public anthropologist, Ben uses academic research to pursue social justice in public life and has appeared on the BBC World Service and has commented in Ha’aretz, Times of Israel, The Independent, Evening Standard, and NewsWeek. Ben is part of the editorial team at Anthropology & Medicine.

Selected publications:

  • 2020. ‘I Didn’t Know How to be with my Husband’: State-Religion Struggles over Sex Education in Israel and England. Anthropology & Education Quarterly (with Lea Taragin-Zeller).
  • 2020. Arbitrating Abortion: Sex selection and care work among abortion providers in England. Medical Anthropology (with Maya Unnithan).
  • 2019. Making Bodies Kosher: The Politics of Reproduction among Haredi Jews in England. Berghahn Books.
  • 2018. Reproductive Rebellions in Britain and the Republic of Ireland: Contemporary and Past Abortion Activism and Alternative Sites of Care. Feminist Encounters (with Sarah Crook).

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Lea Taragin-Zeller

2 LTZ

Research Fellow
Woolf Institute and ReproSoc (Reproductive Sociology Research Group), University of Cambridge

https://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/people/lea-taragin-zellerhttps://www.reprosoc.sociology.cam.ac.uk/directory/lea-taragin-zeller

Bio
Lea Taragin-Zeller is a social anthropologist. Situated at the intersection of the anthropology of religion, gender and bio-medicine, Lea’s research explores how ‘secular’ and scientific knowledge is negotiated among ethnic and faith minorities, influencing their decisions and raising new ethical dilemmas. More specifically, her research explores how religious minorities in both Israel (especially ultra-Orthodox Jews) and the UK (Jews and Muslims) integrate and reconcile frameworks of gender equality and science knowledge alongside faith, religious theology and authority. From contraception to abortions to genetic testing, she examines everyday decision-making vis-à-vis state-minority relations and transnational gender power dynamics. Lea is currently working on a new research project on Religion, Public Health and COVID-19 (together with Dr. Ben Kasstan, Hebrew University of Jerusalem). She is also a member of the interdisciplinary research group :”“Communicating Science among the Jewish Ultra-Orthodox in Israel: Journalistic Praxis and Audience Reception in Insular Communities” (together with Prof. Ayelet Baram-Tsabari, Technion;  Yael Rosenblum, Technion; Prof. Oren Golan and Prof. Yariv Tsfati, University of Haifa, funded by Israel’s Ministry of Science and Technology). She has published in Medical Anthropology, Anthropology and Education Quarterly and serves as a section editor in Cambridge's journal of Reproductive Biomedicine and Society Online.

 

Selected publications:

 

Additional link: https://cambridge.academia.edu/LeaTaraginZellerhttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lea_Taragin-Zeller

 

Professor Dr Hansjörg Dilger

3 HD

 

Head of the Medical Anthropology Research Area
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin 
https://www.polsoz.fu-berlin.de/en/ethnologie/personen/professorinnen/dilger.html>

Hansjörg Dilger’s research interests include medical anthropology and global health, religion and religious diversity, schools and education, transnationalism and migration, and urban anthropology. Regionally, his research focuses on eastern and southern Africa as well as on migratory contexts in Germany. Between 1995 and 2006, Dilger conducted long-term fieldwork on HIV/AIDS and social relations in Tanzania, focusing on the dynamics of kinship- and church-based support in the context of rural-urban migration as well as on the identity politics and the limitations of collective action in urban NGOs. His more recent research on neo-Pentecostal churches and revivalist Muslim organizations in Dar es Salaam has explored the dynamics of moral and religious belonging, charismatic healing and body practices, and processes of spatialization and institutionalization in religiously diverse settings. Since 2015, Dilger has been part of a collective of refugee women, students, lecturers, and activists that has worked and published on the situations and experiences of female refugees in Berlin. Dilger is PI of the following ongoing research projects (all funded by German Research Foundation, DFG): "Governing Religious Diversity in Berlin: Affective Dynamics of In- and Exclusion in Urban Space" (within the collaborative research centre "Affective Societies", with Omar Kasmani and Dominik Mattes); "Religious Reform, Faith-Based Development and the Public Sphere in Sub-Saharan Africa (Lagos, Dar es Salaam and Cape Town)" (together with Abdulkader Tayob, University of Cape Town, Felician Tungaraza, University of Dar es Salaam, and Marloes Janson, SOAS University of London); and "Productive Pathologies: Professional Patients and the Commodification of Illness in Egypt" (with Mustafa Abdalla).


Selected publications:

  • Dilger, Hansjörg, Astrid Bochow, Marian Burchardt, and Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon (eds.). 2020. Affective Trajectories: Religion and Emotion in African Cityscapes. Durham: Duke University Press.
  • Dilger, Hansjörg and Dominik Mattes. 2018. "Introduction: Im/Mobility and Dis/Connectivity in Medical Globalization: How global is Global Health?" In: Global Public Health 13 (3): 265-75. (Introduction to special issue, guest edited by D. Mattes and H. Dilger).
  • Dilger, Hansjörg and Kristina Dohrn (eds.), in collaboration with International Women Space. 2016. Living in Refugee Camps in Berlin: Women’s Perspectives and Experiences. Berlin: Weißensee Verlag. 

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hansjoerg_Dilger>

 

 

Professor Dr Nurit Stadler

4 NS

Associate Professor
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
https://en.sociology.huji.ac.il/people/norit-stadler 

Nurit Stadler’s research interests include fundamentalism, the Ultra-orthodox community, Greek-Orthodox and Roman Catholic rituals in Jerusalem, text-based communities, the veneration of Mary in Israel/Palestine, and the study of female saint shrines, sacred nature and sacred iconography. Stadler is the author of three books: Yeshiva Fundamentalism: Piety, Gender and Resistance in the Ultra-Orthodox World published with New York University Press, in 2008. This book is an analysis of the reconstruction of masculine in the fundamentalist world as a result of the challenges of modernity. It addresses these questions through an investigation of the redefinition of the family, work, the army and civil society in the Ultra-Orthodox yeshiva world in Israel. Stadler is also the author of A Well-Worn Tallus for a New Ceremony (2012) with Academic Studies Press (Brighton, MA). In this book she explored new aspects of voluntarism, citizenship, family life and the concept of freedom in the ultraorthodox culture today. Her third book Voices of the Ritual (Oxford University Press 2020) analyzes the revival of and manifestation of rituals at female saint shrines in the Holy Land. Since 2012 she has been involved with the project on sacred shrines in Israel/Palestine. In this project she studies various aspects of pilgrimage and veneration of sacred shrines, especially female shrines. Her comparative study of these shrines opens a set of questions about the centrality of fertility cults and female landscape at the age of modernity and technology of reproduction. Stadler is directing an Ethnographic Lab on issues of religion, sacredness, politics, borders and the nation state. In this, project students and researchers from around the world participate in studying and comparing ethnographies of sacred places.

Selected publications:

  • 2020. Voices of the Ritual: Devotion to Female Saints and Shrines in the Holy Land. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • 2012. A Well-Worn Tallis for a New Ceremony: Trends in Israeli Haredi culture. Academic Studies Press.
  • 2008. Yeshiva Fundamentalism: Piety, Gender and Resistance in the Ultra-Orthodox World. New York: New York University Press.

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Nurit_Stadlerhttps://huji.academia.edu/NuritStadler

 

Professor Dr Netta Barak-Corren

5 NBC

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
https://en.law.huji.ac.il/people/netta-barak-corren

Netta Barak-Corren is an Assistant Professor of Law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.   She received her first dual-major degree in Law and Cognitive Science from the Hebrew University as the Valedictorian of her class and her Doctorate in Law from Harvard University. Netta’s research centers around empirical and behavioral analysis of public and constitutional law. She is particularly interested in questions relating to law and religion, equality, and conflicts of norms, both at the individual and societal levels.  Her research won numerous grants and awards, most notably the Gorni Prize for an Outstanding Junior Faculty in Public Law, the Birk prize for Excellence in Legal Studies, Stanford’s International Junior Faculty Forum, Harvard’s Sinclair Kennedy Fellowship, the Howard Raiffa Best Paper Prize, the Fisher-Sander Best Paper Prize, and the Menachem Goldberg Best Paper Award. Prior to academia, Netta clerked for the Chief Justice of Israeli Supreme Court, Hon. Dorit Beinish.

Selected publications:

  • Netta Barak-Corren, Reexamining the evidence on Ultra-Orthodox attitudes and gender separation in academia. 49 MISHPATIM—HEBREW U. LAW REVIEW (2019) [in Hebrew].
  • Netta Barak-Corren, Yuval Feldman, & Noam Gidron. The Provocative Effect of Law: Majority Nationalism and Minority Discrimination, 15(4) JOURNAL OF EMPIRICAL LEGAL STUDIES 951-986 (2018).

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Netta_Barak-Corren

Professor Dr Yael Hashiloni-Dolev

6 YHD

 

Associate Professor
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
https://in.bgu.ac.il/humsos/soc-ant/en/pages/staff/yaelhd-en.aspx

Yael Hashiloni-Dolev is a sociologist of health and illness. She is a member of Israel’s National Bioethics Council and a co-president of the Israeli Society for the History & Philosophy of Science. Her areas of interest include new reproductive technologies, genetics, gender, bioethics, contemporary parenthood and posthumous reproduction. She has authored three books: A Life (Un)Worthy of Living: Reproductive Genetics in Israel and Germany (Springer, 2007), The Fertility Revolution (Modan, 2013, in Hebrew), and New Reproductive Technologies: Social and Bio-Ethical Debates (Open University, in Hebrew). She published many articles on reprogenetics, sex selection, the moral status of the embryo and cryo-preservation. She is also a co-editor of Boas, H., Hashiloni-Dolev, Y., Davidovitch, N., Filc D. and Lavi, S. (Eds). 2018. Bioethics and Biopolitics in Israel: Socio-Legal, Political and Empirical Analysis. Cambridge University Press.

Selected publications:

  • Hashiloni-Dolev, Y. 2007. A Life (Un)Worthy of Living: Reproductive Genetics in Israel and Germany. Dordrecht: Springer. Under the Series: International Library of Ethics, Law and the New Medicine.
  • Hashiloni-Dolev, Y. 2006. Cultural Differences in Medical Risk Assessments during Genetic Prenatal Diagnosis: The Case of Sex Chromosome Anomalies in Israel and Germany. Medical Anthropology Quarterly
  • Hashiloni-Dolev,  Y., & Shkedi, S. 2007. On new reproductive technologies and family ethics: Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PDG) for sibling donors (SD) in Israel and Germany. Social Science and Medicine
  • Hashiloni-Dolev, Y., & Weiner, N. 2008. Reproductive technologies and the moral status of the embryo: A view from Israel and Germany. Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Hashiloni-Dolev, Y., and Raz, A. 2010. Between Social hypocrisy and social responsibility: Professional views of eugenics, disability and repro-genetics in Germany and Israel. New Genetics & Society

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yael_Hashiloni-Dolev

 

Bat-sheva Hass

7 BH

PhD candidate
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
https://sociology.huji.ac.il/people/בת-שבע-הס-0

Bat-sheva Hass is a PhD candidate at the department of Sociology and Anthropology, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her main focus has been on anthropology of religion, anthropology of conversion, gender and religion. Specifically, her dissertation is an integration between anthropology of conversion, anthropology of religion, the politics of belonging, and politics of identity. The case study she is undertaking is a story of Dutch women who converted to Islam and how they perceive their sense of identity and belonging in their current and former lifestyles. In addition, Bat sheva works as a teaching assistant and teaches introduction to qualitative methodology at the department of sociology and anthropology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Bat sheva also works as the ERC coordinator at the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Currently she coordinates two ERC projects: Digital Values and Mediating the Future: The Social Dynamics of Public Projections- PROFECI. On both projects she is in charge of the budgets, does administrative as well as academic tasks, including quantitative coding etc.

Selected publications:

  • Hass, Bat Sheva. 2020. The Burka Ban - Islamic dress, Freedom and Choice in the Netherlands in light of the 2019 Burka Ban Law, Religions 2020, 11(2), 93-127.
  • Hass, Bat Sheva.; Lutek, H. 2019. Faith and Fashion: Islamic dress and Identity. Religions 2019, 10(6), 359-389.
  • Hass, Bat Sheva; Lutek, H. 2018. The Dutch inside the ‘Moslima’ and the ‘Moslima’ inside the Dutch: Processing the Religious Experience of Muslim Women in The Netherlands. Societies 2018 (4), 8, 123158

 

Professor Dr Claudia Liebelt

8 CL

Assistant Professor
Social Anthropology, University of Bayreuth
https://www.ethnologie.uni-bayreuth.de/de/team/Liebelt-Claudia/index.php

Claudia Liebelt’s research foci are in the Anthopology of the Body and the Senses, Political Anthropology, Gender and Sexualities, Care and Intimate Labour, as well as Islam and Secularity. Claudia is especially interested in debates on the biopolitics of beauty, embodied normativities, postsecularism, new materialities, as well as categorizations of race, class and gender, with a regional focus on the Middle East and Northern Africa. As part of a Heisenberg Position at the University of Bayreuth, she is currently conducting research on the "Olfactories of Hygiene," that is, the social configurations of bodily hygiene, smell, and the role of hand sanitizers during the COVID-19 pandemics in Turkey and Germany.

Selected publications:

  • Forthcoming. Istanbul Appearances: Beauty and the Making of Middle-Class Femininities in Urban Turkey. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.
  • Forthcoming. From Manicurist to Aesthetic Vanguard: the Biopolitics of Beauty and the Changing Role of Beauty Service Work in Turkey. In: Tate, Sh. and E. Gutiérrez-Rodríguez (eds.) Palgrave Handbook on Race and Gender. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Forthcoming, Negotiating “Islamic” Beauty in Turkey, or Conceptualizing the Complex Entanglements Between Beauty and Religion. In: Craig, M. (ed.) Beauty Politics (Routledge Companion Series). London, New York: Routledge.
  • 2019. Aesthetic Citizenship in Istanbul: on manufacturing beauty and negotiating belonging through the body in urban Turkey. Citizenship Studies 23(7): 686–702.
  • 2019. Secular self-fashioning against “Islamization:” aesthetic body modification and female subjectivities among the secular middle class in Istanbul. In: Scheer, M., Fadil, N. and B. Schepelern Johansen (eds). Secular Bodies, Affects and Emotions: European Configurations. Bloomsbury, pp. 109–22. 

Additional links: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Claudia_Liebelt2https://uni-bayreuth.academia.edu/ClaudiaLiebelt

Dr Mirjam Lücking

9 ML

Postdoctoral Fellow
Martin Buber Society of Fellows, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
https://buberfellows.huji.ac.il/people/mirjam-lücking

Mirjam Lücking is an anthropologist, working on contemporary expressions of religion and politics in Indonesia and the Middle East, with ethnographic research on various forms of transnational mobility, such as pilgrimage, tourism, and labor migration. She is currently affiliated with the Martin Buber Society of Fellows at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Selected publications:

  • Lücking, Mirjam. 2020/forthcoming. Indonesians and Their Arab World: Guided Mobility Among Labor Migrants and Mecca Pilgrims. Ithaca (NY): Cornell University Press.
  • Lücking, Mirjam. 2019. “Travelling with the Idea of Taking Sides: Indonesian Pilgrimages to Jerusalem.” Bijdragen tot de taal-, land- en volkenkunde / Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia 175 (2-3): 196–224.
  • Lücking, Mirjam. 2017. “Working in Mecca. How Informal Pilgrimage-Migration from Madura, Indonesia, to Saudi Arabia Challenges State Sovereignty.” European Journal of East Asian Studies 16 (2): 248–74.

Additional link: https://shamash.academia.edu/MirjamL%C3%BCcking

Dr Dominik Mattes

10 DM

Postdoctoral Fellow
Collaborative Research Center 'Affective Societies' and the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin
https://www.polsoz.fu-berlin.de/en/ethnologie/personen/wiss_mitarb_u_koord_aus_drittmitteln/mattes.html

Dominik Mattes is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the Collaborative Research Center (SFB) “Affective Societies” at Freie Universität Berlin. Since 2014, he has been co-chairing the German Anthropological Association’s Work Group Medical Anthropology. His book, Fierce Medicines, Fragile Socialities. Grounding Global HIV Treatment in Tanzania (Berghahn, 2019) examines the political-economic conditions of providing antiretroviral medicines, the manifold intricacies of living a life with these pharmaceuticals, and the interference of religious discourse and practice with the biomedical therapy in Northeastern Tanzania. Aside from Medical Anthropology and Critical Global Health, Dominik’s work is situated at the intersection of religion and migration. While his first postdoctoral project explored notions of belonging among the congregants of a West-African Pentecostal church in Berlin, his current research focuses on how migration-related religious diversity is affectively governed in the same city.

Selected publications:

  • 2019. Fierce Medicines, Fragile Socialities. Grounding Global HIV Treatment in Tanzania. New York, Oxford: Berghahn.
  • 2020. Dominik Mattes, Bernhard Hadolt and Brigit Obrist. .2020. Introduction. Rethinking sociality and health through transfiguration. In: Medicine Anthropology Theory 7(1): 66-86.
  • 2018. Hansjörg Dilger and Dominik Mattes. Im/mobility and dis/connectivity in medical globalization. How global is Global Health? In: Global Public Health 13(3): 265-275.
  • 2015. Hansjörg Dilger, Susann Huschke and Dominik Mattes. Introduction. Ethics, epistemology, and engagement: Encountering values in medical anthropology. In: Medical Anthropology 34(1): 1-10. 

Additional links: https://www.researchgate.net/search.Search.html?type=researcher&query=Dominik%20Mattes; ​​​​​​​https://fu-berlin.academia.edu/DominikMattes

 

Ursula Probst

11 UP

PhD Candidate
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin
https://www.polsoz.fu-berlin.de/ethnologie/personen/doktorand_innen/probst.html

Ursula Probst is a PhD student at the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology (Freie Universität Berlin) investigating (labour) migration, the social production of bodies, and health in urban settings with a particular focus on the commercialisation of sexuality, intimate labor and the sex industry. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with migrants from Eastern Europe who are/were working in different sectors of the sex industry in Berlin, she is currently analysing the racialised and sexualised dimensions of so-called "Europeanisation" processes and (Eastern) European (non-)belongings as an embodied practice.

Selected publications:

  • Probst, Ursula. Forthcoming. Vielschichtige Lebenswelten, komplexe Vulnerabilitäten. Zur Lebens- und Arbeitssituation der Frauen am Straßenstrich im Berliner Kurfürstenkiez. [Multilayered lives, complex vulnerabilities. On the living and working conditions of women doing street based sex work in Berlins Kurfürstenkiez neighborhood] Zeitschrift für Sexualforschung.
  • Probst, Ursula. 2015. Von käuflichem Sex, Opfern und Moral – Perspektiven von Sexarbeiterinnen auf Rechte, Sexualität und Professionalisierung im Arbeitsalltag in Berlin. [On commercial sex, victims and morality. Perspectives of sex workers on rights, sexuality and professionalisation in everyday work lives in Berlin] Weißensee Verlag.
  • Probst, Ursula. 2015. Support for Sex Workers as Occupational Support? Research For Sex Work 15, 19-22.
  • Huschke, Susann, P. Shirlow, D. Schubotz, E. Ward, U. Probst und C. Ní Dhónaill. 2014. Research into Prostitution in Northern Ireland. Research Report.

Additional links: https://fu-berlin.academia.edu/UrsulaProbsthttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ursula_Probst

Dr Vanessa Rau

12 VB

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religion & Ethnic Diversity
https://www.mmg.mpg.de/person/99020

Vanessa Rau is an interdisciplinary social scientist/sociologist with a special interest in Religion and Secularism, Migration and the Politics of Difference. Her current research concerns, “Civil Society Organizations and the Challenges of Migration and Diversity: Agents of Change” especially in the Kontext of “Disability and Sexual Minorities”. Vanessa completed her PhD at the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, and focused on migration and diaspora, religion, secularities and the politics of identity in diverse urban spaces. Her dissertation “Contesting the Secular and Converting Space in Berlin? Becoming Jewish in an Urban Scene” examines a newly emerging Jewish-Hebrew scene in Berlin and investigates how religious and secular belonging are negotiated under specific discursive representations. Vanessa holds a BA and a PhD from the University of Cambridge as well as a MA from Humboldt and Freie Universität, Berlin.

Selected publications: 

  • Hensold, J., Kynes, J.A., Öhlmann, P., Rau, V., Schinagl, R.C., Taleb, A. (Eds.) 2020. "Religion in Motion. Rethinking Religion, Knowledge and Discourse in a Globalizing World". Springer.
  • Rau, V. 2019. Turning the Kaleidoscope and pluralism inside-out: the case of Berlin’s Jewish scene. In J.-J. Bock (Ed.), Emergent religious pluralisms (pp. 195-221). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, Springer Nature.
  • Rau, V. 2016. Exotisierung, Faszination und Befremdung. Ein Blick auf Migration und Begegnung zwischen Israel und Deutschland. In O. Glöckner, & J. H. Schoeps (Eds.), Deutschland, die Juden und der Staat Israel. Eine politische Bestandsaufnahme. (pp. 216-246). Hildesheim/Zürich/New York: Georg Olms Verlag.
  • Rau, V. 2014. Vehementer Säkularismus als Antisemitismus? Aus Politik und Zeitgeschehen, APuZ, 28-30, 31-38.

Dr Nasima Selim

13 NS

Postdoctoral Research Associate
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin
https://www.visual-anthropology.fu-berlin.de/staff/External_Lecturer1/Selim/index.html

Nasima Selim holds a doctoral degree in Social and Cultural anthropology from the Freie Universität Berlin. She is a former mental health physician with two master’s degrees, in medical anthropology and public health. Her research and teaching interests include healing across religion and medicine, global health and well-being, affective ecologies, migratory practices, ethnographic theories, methods, and writing. Nasima is a spokesperson of the working group public anthropology and a member of the working group medical anthropology at the German Anthropological Association. She is a lifetime member of the Public Health Association of Bangladesh and a member of the European Association of Social Anthropologists. Nasima is a member of the editorial team of #Witnessing Corona, a collaborative blog-series launched in March 2020.

Selected publications:

  • Selim, Nasima. In press. “Letter from the (Un)Seen Virus: (Post) Humanist Perspectives in Corona Times.” Social Anthropology/Anthropologie sociale COVID-19 Forum.
  • Selim, Nasima. Mustafa Abdalla, Lilas Alloulou, Mohamed Alaedden Halli, Seth M. Holmes, Maria Ibiß, Gabi Jaschke, and Johanna Gonçalves Martín. 2018.          “Coming together in the so-called refugee crisis: A collaboration among refugee newcomers, migrants, activists, and anthropologists in Berlin.” Action in Anthropology 25 (3): 34-44.
  • Thomas Stodulka, Nasima Selim, and Dominik Mattes. 2018. “Affective scholarship: Doing anthropology with epistemic emotions.” Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology, 46 (4): 519–536.
  • Selim, Nasima. 2015. “Sufi body practices and therapeutic politics in Berlin.” In Gritt Klinkhammer and Eva Tolksdorf, eds. Somatisierung des Religiösen. Empirische Studien zum rezenten religiösen Heilungs -und Therapiemarkt, 237-282. Bremen: Universität Bremen. 

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Nasima_Selim

Dr Guy Shalev

14 GS

Postdoctoral Fellow
Martin Buber Society of Fellows, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
https://buberfellows.huji.ac.il/people/guy-shalev

Guy Shalev is a medical anthropologist interested in the intersections of professional and national politics in the Israeli health sphere. His research considers the everyday border-work that marks the lives of Palestinian physicians in the Israeli public health system and ask how medical expertise and ethics play a role in ethnonational politics both within and without the medical field.

Selected publication:

  • Shalev, Guy. 2016. A Doctor’s Testimony: Medical Neutrality and the Visibility of Palestinian Grievances in Jewish-Israeli Publics. Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 40(2), 242-262.

Additional link: https://unc.academia.edu/guyshalev

 

Dr Anita von Poser

15 AVP

Postdoctoral Researcher
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Freie Universität Berlin
https://www.polsoz.fu-berlin.de/en/ethnologie/forschung/arbeitsstellen/anthropologie_der_emotionen/personen/poser-anita/index.html

Anita von Poser’s research interests pertain to the field of psychological anthropology with a special focus on affects, emotions, belonging, and empathy as well as migration, aging, care, and the life course. Her current research involves ethnographic research with Vietnamese-born social workers in Berlin as well as trans-disciplinary collaborative work on the affective efforts of migration in clinical settings and everyday lifeworlds with colleagues from the field of cultural psychiatry and global mental health.

Selected publications: 

  • Nguyen, Main Huong, Jörg-Christian Lanca, Eric Hahn, Anita von Poser, Edda Willamowski, Ketja Wingenfeld, Roland Burian, Albert Diefenbacher & Thi Minh Tam Ta (2020). Perceived Emotional Distress among Vietnamese Outpatients in Germany . An Interdisciplinary, Mixed-method Study. Transcultural Psychiatry.
  • von Poser, Anita & Edda Willamowski (2020). The Power of Shared Embodiment. Renegotiating Non-/belonging and In/exclusion in an Ephemeral Community of Care. Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry.
  • von Poser, Anita Edda Heyken, Thi Minh Tam Ta & Eric Hahn (2019). Emotion Repertoires. In Jan Slaby & Christian von Scheve (eds.), Affective Societies. Key Concepts. New York: Routledge, pp. 241-251.
  • Heyken, Edda, Anita von Poser, Eric Hahn, Thi Main Huong Nguyen, Jörg-Christian Lanca & Thi Minh Tam Ta (2019). Researching Affects in the Clinic and Beyond. Multi-perspectivity, Ethnography, and Mental Health-Care Intervention. In Antje Kahl (ed.), Analyzing Affective Societies. Methods and Methodologies, New York: Routledge, pp. 249-264.

Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Anita_Poser

 

Edda Willamowski

16 EW

Research Associate
Affective Societies, Freie Universität Berlin
https://fu-berlin.academia.edu/EddaHeyken

Edda Willamowski is a Sociocultural Anthropologist trained at Freie Universität Berlin, University of Münster and Radboud University Nijmegen. In her dissertation, she analyzes the complex interconnections of affects, belonging, memory, and silence in the lives of elderly Vietnamese refugees from a psychological-anthropological perspective. Since 2015, she has been Research Associate of the Collaborative Research Center 1171 Affective Societies: Dynamics of Social Co-existence in Mobile Worlds, where she works within an anthropological-psychiatric research project as part of a collaboration between FU Berlin and Charité Berlin.

Selected publications:

  • 2020. The Power of Shared Embodiment. Renegotiating Non-/belonging and In/exclusion in an Ephemeral Community of Care. Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry (with Anita von Poser).
  • 2020. Migration-related emotional distress among Vietnamese psychiatric patients in Germany – An interdisciplinary, mixed methods study. Transcultural Psychiatry (with Nguyen, Main Huong and Jörg-Christian Lanca, Eric Hahn, Anita von Poser, Katja Wingenfeld, Ronald Burian, Albert Diefenbacher, Thi Minh Tam Ta).
  •  
  • 2019. Researching Affects in the Clinic and Beyond. Multi-perspectivity, Ethnography, and Mental Health-Care Intervention. In Antje Kahl (eds.), Analyzing Affective Societies. Methods and Methodologies, New York: Routledge, pp.249-264 (with Anita von Poser, Eric Hahn, Thi Main Huong Nguyen, Jörg-Christian Lanca & Thi Minh Tam Ta). 
  • 2019. Emotion Repertoires. In Jan Slaby & Christian von Scheve (eds.), Affective Societies. Key Concepts. New York: Routledge. pp.241-251.
  • 2019. Belonging. In Jan Slaby & Christian von Scheve (eds.) Affective Societies. Key Concepts. New York: Routledge, pp. 300-309 (with Dominik Mattes, Omar Kasmani & Marion Acker).
  • 2019. Unravelling Silence from a Psychological Anthropological Perspective. URL: http://anthropologyofsilence.com/

Additional links: https://fu-berlin.academia.edu/EddaHeykenhttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Edda_Heyken

Professor Dr Tanya Zion-Waldoks

17 TZW

Lecturer
Seymour Fox School of Education, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 
https://education.huji.ac.il/Tanya_Zion-Waldoks

Tanya Zion-Waldoks, a lecturer in the Seymour Fox School of Education at Hebrew University, is a feminist activist and mother of four. Tanya is fascinated by the intersection of religion, gender, education and politics. Current research explores religious women’s feminist activism and political subjectivities through qualitative studies with a comparative perspective in Israel. Her work has been published in leading journals such as Gender & Society and Signs. Tanya received her PhD from Bar-Ilan’s Gender Studies program, a Kreitman post-doctoral fellowship at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and a Rothschild and Israel Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for the Study of Religion, Princeton University.

Selected publications:

  • Zion-Waldoks, Tanya, Irshai, R., Shoughry, B. Forthcoming. The First Female Qadi in Israel’s Shari`a (Muslim) Courts: Nomos and Narrative, Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies 38:2.
  • Zion-Waldoks, Tanya. 2018. “’I Believe in Change from Within’: Jewish-Orthodox Agunah Activists’ Strategies of Change”. HaMizrach HaHadash – The New East. (Special issue on Gender and the Middle East), Mira Tzoreff and Tammy Razi (eds.), pp. 59-89. [Hebrew]
  • Zion-Waldoks, Tanya and Pnina Motzafi-Haller. 2018. “Whose House Is This? Gendered Dis/Belongings, Home-Making and Displacement in Israel’s Rabbinic Courts”, Signs 44:1, pp. 177-203.
  • Kark, Ronit, Ruth Preser and Tanya Zion-Waldoks. 2016. From a Politics of Dilemmas to a Politics of Paradoxes: Feminism, Pedagogy, and Women’s Leadership for Social Change. Journal of Management Education, 40:3, pp. 293-320. (Special Issue on “Women’s Leadership Development Programs”).
  • Zion-Waldoks, Tanya. 2015. Politics of Devoted Resistance: Agency, Feminism and Religion among Orthodox Agunah Activists in Israel. Gender & Society, 29:1, pp. 73-97.


Additional link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tanya_Zion_Waldokshttps://huji.academia.edu/TanyaZionWaldoks

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